All posts by bizeditors

Three Ways to Lower Costs and Boost Profits by Going Greener

Every business wants to increase revenue and cut expenses. How about if you do both of those things, and help the planet at the same time?

How? By going greener in your business.

Yes, I know—you’ve heard for years: “I’d love to go green but it’s too expensive and difficult!” Maybe you’ve even said this.

The good news is that’s nonsense. Done the right way, going greener can be easy, cheap, and profitable.

Let me say that differently: sure, there are plenty of expensive, difficult ways to green a business. But there are also lots of ways to go greener that you can do quickly and easily, for little or no cost. Since going green is a process and not an absolute, start with the easy, cheap, and profitable things!

Then you can allocate the money you save into new green initiatives that might not have quite so high an ROI.

1. Cut Your Paper Costs by 60 Percent or More—In Two Easy Steps

As your printers and copiers wear out, replace them with the “duplexing” kind, capable of printing both sides of the paper automatically. Set the defaults to double-sided printing, and train your staff to keep those settings unless they’re doing something that needs to be single-sided—which, usually, is a very tiny percentage of the paper flow. When I did this, I immediately started saving about 40 percent of my paper costs (and I use recycled paper, which usually does cost more).

And even before that, train your employees to bump up the default screen magnification or font size (using the View: Zoom command in Microsoft Word or most web browsers, and the Settings or Preferences command in e-mail programs) so that even though it takes the same space to print, the screen displays bigger type: comfortable enough to read. I used to print documents that were more than five pages or so, but now I’ll read even 50 pages on the screen, because the big print doesn’t make my eyes tired nearly as fast. Now, I sometimes go many days without even turning on my printer.

2. Plug the Energy Holes

How much energy is leaking right out of your building, or sucked away by “energy vampires”? If you’re like most businesses, you’re losing a lot that you can recapture with two quick, inexpensive methods.

Put your hand next to an empty electrical socket on a wall that borders the outside. If on a cold winter evening or a hot summer day, you feel a temperature difference between the inside and outside air, you’re feeling your hard-earned money slipping through the wall. Air that you’ve paid to heat or cool to the optimum temperature is migrating outside, increasing your complicity in global climate change while running up your energy bill.

You can easily stop this air from flowing out. A tiny investment in foam insulators and outlet protectors will pay for itself very quickly. In the US, where I live, many utility companies will give you the foam insulators for free. Even if you have to buy them at the hardware store, they’re very cheap. It takes under two minutes to unscrew the socket or switchplate cover—remember, you only have to do the ones on outside walls—pop in the foam pad, and screw the cover back on.

Now, for any outside-wall socket that doesn’t have a plug in it, pop in an outlet protector: a little piece of plastic designed to keep baby fingers out of trouble. Hardware stores have them in the baby department.

Finally, caulk any windows that leak air around the edges (use removable rope caulk if these windows are designed to open) and install door sweeps if you’re losing air around exterior doors,

Once you’ve blocked all that air from migrating back and forth, get rid of your “energy vampires”: equipment that stays on all the time, in standby mode, even when switched off—anything that turns on instantly without any warmup is probably guilty of sucking out a surprisingly large amount of power over time. The easiest way to deal with this is to buy multi-outlet power strips that have an on-off switch. Get in the habit of turning the power strips off until you need them, and your printers, copiers, computers, coffee machines, microwave ovens and other devices will stop drinking power all night long. If you train your staff to flip those switches, you’ll be amazed at how much you save.

3. Market to the Green Consumer

The green market is growing at better than 29 percent a year, according to Allen Rubin, director of the National Environmental Hall of Fame.

And as soon as you begin to take some steps toward lowering your carbon footprint and conserving resources, you’re entitled to approach this lucrative market. The more you do to go green, of course, the deeper you can go with messages about sustainability to win new business and higher revenues. But even if you’re just starting with the easy steps above, you can make this a marketing opportunity—NOT by “greenwashing” or pretending to be greener than you are, but by using these tentative steps as a jumping off point to engage your customers and prospects. For example, an in-store or social media campaign that says “this is what we’ve done so far. If you were us, what else would you do to go farther down the green path?

More Easy Green Ideas

If you’re excited about saving more energy and resources, here’s a gift for you: a free copy of my e-book, Painless Green: 111 Tips to Help the Environment, Lower Your Carbon Footprint, Cut Your Budget, and Improve Your Quality of Life-With No Negative Impact on Your Lifestyle. Just visit http://painlessgreenbook.com/earthday, and enter the code, “earthday” (without the quote marks).

Want to market green products and services to green AND non-green audiences? Marketing consultant, syndicated columnist, and copywriter Shel Horowitz shows you how to “reach green, socially conscious consumers with marketing that has THEM calling YOU.” He specializes in green and ethical marketing strategies and materials for businesses and organizations. The primary author of the category bestseller Guerrilla Marketing Goes Green: Winning Strategies to Improve Your Profits and Your (John Wiley & Sons, 2010), Shel writes the monthly column Green And Profitable. His website is http://greenandprofitable.com.

WriteEasy: Anatomy Of Good Written English

In our society, the study of language is the domain of poets, novelists, and literary critics. Just look at the value of a college degree in English versus one in computer science or accounting. But is this an accurate assessment of value?

Language is the primary conductor between you and your audience. Ineffective language weakens and distorts ideas. If you want to be understood and your ideas to spread, you must learn to write good English.
But, what is ‘Good English’? Good English is that which is readable by most people. It has several nuances – let us discuss a few!

Brevity

  • ‘We have no information at this time, but we’ll make a formal announcement the moment we do’ can be briefly expressed as ‘ We don’t know yet, but will tell you when we do’.
  • A ‘manually operated, personalised, recreational, eco-tool’ can also be called a ‘spade’.

But unfortunately verbosity is usually equated with command over the language. The airline pilot who announces that he is presently anticipating or experiencing considerable precipitation wouldn’t think of saying it may rain. That sentence is too simple–there must be something wrong with it!

To improve brevity, simply use George Orwell’s advice

Never use a metaphor, simile, or other figure of speech which you are used to seeing in print.
Never use a long word where a short one will do.
If it is possible to cut a word out, always cut it out.
Never use the passive where you can use the active.
Never use a foreign phrase, a scientific word, or a jargon word if you can think of an everyday English equivalent.

If you get criticized for limited word choice, rejoice for being in good company. When Hemingway was criticized by Faulkner, he had replied:

‘Poor Faulkner. Does he really think big emotions come from big words? He thinks I don’t know the ten-dollar words. I know them all right. But there are older and simpler and better words, and those are the ones I use’.

Clarity

Clarity has two angles –

Frequently confused words:

Some words are frequently confused due to similarity in spelling, rhyme or closeness in meaning. ‘Complementary’ gets written as ‘complimentary’. ‘Liable’ gets used where ‘likely’ would fit better. ‘Anxious’ is used where ‘Eager’ is desirable. More here.

Burden on those with lower standards:

Most writers assume that the reader would share their own standards of English and know the context in which they are writing. This may not always be true. The executive or shop floor person within your own organization may have a much lower standard than your own. And think about the problems of writing in today’s globalized environment.

Compare the following sentences –
1. Reading is hard; writing is harder.
2.  Reading is difficult; writing is more difficult than reading.

On first look, the first version appears better written than the second. It not only contains fewer words but fewer words with more than one syllable. Version 1 is brief, plain, direct, even slightly poetic. In contrast, the second is slow, pedestrian, and prosaic. Yet, people who read English as their second language would probably have more trouble with the first than the second. Why?

In the first, better-written version, the key word is hard, a word with several meanings. Here the writer has used it in the sense of ‘difficult’ in a metaphorical way. However, a person learning English is unlikely to know the metaphorical sense of hard as difficult. Nor would the bilingual dictionary such a person consults, list the “difficult” equivalent as the first meaning.

English is the first language of about 400 million people, but there are more than another billion people who speak it as a second language. This makes it necessary for global writers to use a style that reduces the burden of understanding on others.

Grammar

Errors of grammar increase the likelihood of confusion and also make the writer look uneducated to others. They also suggest that the person in not detail oriented. CEO of a CEO of iFixit, the largest online repair community, has gone so far as to say that he won’t hire anyone with poor grammar. He says, ‘Grammar is my litmus test. All applicants say they’re detail-oriented; I just make my employees prove it’.

Form & Usage

Along with grammar, bad form and usage also make a writer appear uneducated to others. Writing ‘I find it easy to pull up with you’ instead of ‘I find it easy to pull along with you’ will not endear you to your superiors.

Flexibility through variety

Brief, clear, correct and good form & usage is a winning combination, but even this is not the final or only criterion. Audience analysis has long been a basic principle of effective communication. You would adopt a completely different style of writing altogether when preparing research papers for the scientific or medical community than you would if you were writing the horse racing form guide. Matching writing style to audience is imperative.

So, what can we do about these aspects? I am delighted to present WriteEasy courses from Soluto Learning.

WriteEasy courses provide specific help in respect of all above elements of good English. The courses are completely web-enabled, highly interactive and focused for the needs of their respective segments.

WriteEasy Advanced helps reduce verbosity and improve clarity & flow whereas WriteEasy Essentials helps in correcting grammar and usage. Differences between various courses are here.

Other details, including a free Intro course, are at www.solutolearning.com.

Will Car Sharing Work In India?

Greg Moran and David aim to introduce “Zoom Car India”, a Car Sharing service in India, beginning with Bangalore. While we do have initiatives like www.poolmycar.in in India, “Car Sharing” aims to be different than “Car Pooling” or “Ride Sharing”.  They are using indiegogo.com to raise $ 15,000 out of the $ 500,000 investment they intend to raise after the Proof of Concept (POC) is established.

Zoom Car India
Zoom Car India

Their pitch here states:

If you live in Bangalore, you should donate so that we can bring this service to you as soon as possible! We also have some great incentives to get you behind the wheel of a Zoom vehicle.

If you don’t live in India, you should consider donating because of the enormous social and environmental benefits that car-sharing provides.  By leveraging investment capital and re-investing revenues from members, we will give your donation’s ultimate impact a huge multiplier effect!

More updates on this venture can be seen here.

 

CARMa – Creating Access to Resources and Markets

Professor Nandini Vaidyanathan is a traveling teacher who teaches entrepreneurship in several ivy -league business schools around the world including Princeton, London School of Economics and National University of Singapore, overseas and in India in IIMA, IIMB, IIML and ISB. A year ago, she founded CARMa (Creating Access to Resources & Markets), (www.carmaconnect.in) with a lofty ambition: to change the karma of entrepreneurs in India. She writes a regular monthly column for the magazine, Entrepreneur. She is a TED speaker. She has just published her book Entrepedia, a step by step guide to becoming an entrepreneur in India. The book has a prelaunch sale of 50,000 copies and is on its way to becoming a best seller.

Here, she is sharing about CARMa offerings.

Our whole life revolves around entrepreneurs. We are passionate believers that India should be a country of a billion entrepreneurs – either you have your own enterprise or you think and feel so entrepreneurially that you feel like an entrepreneur even if you don’t own the enterprise.

We believe that the biggest pain point for all entrepreneurs, irrespective of what stage they are in, is access to resources and markets. And that’s where CARMa (Creating Access to Resources and Markets) comes in. CARMa addresses this pain point by:

  • CARMa Sutra: Mentoring entrepreneurs (start-ups, mature enterprises and family businesses)
  • CARMa Shala: An online 20-hour certificate course in Entrepreneurship for aspiring entrepreneurs, start-up entrepreneurs as well as employees who have P&L responsibility and are expected to think and behave like entrepreneurs
  • AskYourMentor: Unique real-time ‘need-based’ mentoring when you require it.

CARMa Sutra
Entrepreneurs usually come to us and ask us two things: Will you validate my idea and on what basis do you pick your mentees.

Our answer is standard. No, we will not validate your idea because we have no authority (and we have no certain way of telling you) what will work or which idea might fail. All we will help you do is build a robust business model and such a strong value differentiator that even if the market gets flooded by competitors tomorrow, your customers will still swear by you.

And two, we don’t pick and choose our mentees. We look for just a few things – is the entrepreneur’s heart in the right place and does he have what it takes to last the entrepreneurial journey – the highs and the lows, the good and the bad. Once these two questions are out of the way, CARMa Sutra begins.

CARMa Sutra is our sustained 6-month mentorship program, which is a completely mentee-driven engagement:

  • We mentor entrepreneurs in the startup phase, growth enterprises as well as family businesses.
  • As an entrepreneur, you come to us and identify three areas of mentoring. These could be your vulnerable areas or so critical to building your business that not having a mentor is not an option.
  • Once these are outlined, they are broken into milestones to ensure that you, the mentee, and your lead mentor (Sutradhar) are on the same page.
  • Over the course of the six months, the lead mentor may bring in other mentors, who are domain experts, to mentor you.
  • Write to carmasutra@carmaconnect.in for more or click here for more information: http://carmaconnect.in/carmasutra.php

CARMa Shala
Most people don’t become entrepreneurs in India, simply because they don’t know how. There is no course that tells you in simple and easy steps the things you need to get the idea off the drawing board into the market place.

There is no course in India which is India-centric, real-time and fitted within in the Indian framework. So what’s the point in knowing how to incorporate a company in America, when you want to set up shop in India?

And that’s where CARMa Shala comes into the picture:

  • CARMa Shala is a 20-hour, 20-module online certificate course in Entrepreneurship.
  • It is a go-to course, like a dictionary.
  • If you want to become an entrepreneur, or, if you are in the start-up phase, CARMa Shala tells you in easy, simple, 20 steps, what are the things you need to do from the time you decide to become an entrepreneur to becoming market-ready.

For an individual registration, CARMa Shala costs just Rs. 2,650 (which includes a copy of the best-selling book Entrepedia). You get CARMa Shala through your college to get the benefit of bulk registrations. Click here for more: http://carmaconnect.in/carmashala_more.php

AskYourMentor:
If you’re an entrepreneur on the brink of a crisis or in the thick of it, wouldn’t it be nice if you could have access to a mentor right then and there? A mentor who is a subject-expert; a mentor who has the wisdom gained from experience to give you clarity and direction; and a mentor with whom you can have a trouble-shooting conversation when you need it, as you need it.

All this without paying an arm and a leg, which is what you would if you brought on board a consultant. Get on to www.carmaconnect.in, choose your mentor, buy his time in units of 30 minutes and get mentored instantly! Click here for more information/or to register now: http://carmaconnect.in/askyourmentor.php

OneTree Guide: Secrets of Branding ROI

Praveer Shukla is an advertising and marketing professional with 35 years’ experience in India, Hong Kong, the US, and Oman. His clients have included Dupont, ITC WelcomGroup, ITC Golf, Uncle Chipps’, DCM,Escorts, Star TV, Rajasthan Tourism, Kashmir Tourism, The Oberoi, Milkfood, HM The Sultan of Oman, HH Mahesh Maharishi Yogi, among others.

He is sharing some of his “secrets” here and introducing his company, Onetree Content.

There’s a practical reason why we exist at OneTree Content. But before that, some quick facts from the Canadian Council of Small Business and Entrepreneurship:

  • 85 million businesses start up annually.
  • 64 million small firm deaths in 4 years.
  • 16 million shut down in the very first year.
  • Sad truth – most entrepreneurs will never get to see their dreams come true.
  • In fact, in the next 10 minutes, as you read this, 1,522 new businesses will have downed their shutters for the last time. Talk about love’s labour lost.

Here’s my personal take on the business of entrepreneurship, as I’ve seen it over 40 years.

1. Its a winner-takes-all-world – so listen up.

Especially, if you’re a start up, an entrepreneur, or an SME, listen to experienced people, whether it’s professional groups or forums, your investors, mentors, or coaches. That way you won’t have to re-invent the wheel. And, when you fail – make no mistake about that, you will, at different stages – the people you listen to can be the difference between being stuck with failure and moving on to the next level in your enterprise. And, most importantly, you’ll cover the distance between Idea to Revenue in a much shorter time!

2. Money doesn’t buy products or services. People do.

Know your customers. At OneTree Content, we perform due diligence to know your service and your products cold. We get to know your customers like we know our own parents. We also get to know your product’s positioning in relation to your competitors—without repeated explanation from you which burns up your time and budget.

3. ROI

You’re thinking ROI = Return On Investment, right? Our take on this as specialists in market communications, is different. Unlike earlier times, today, a brand is not recognized by its trademark, mission statement, logo or slogan. That kind of branding went out of the window around the time that electricity was discovered.

Our kind of branding is recognized by the kind of conversations or content that our specialists create about your company, its products, its world, the people who use it, and also, the people who do not use it.

These are conversations that enliven, delight, and empower users. They’re created with authenticity, to communicate the uniqueness of a product or service. By participating and engaging in these conversations, customers are created and references are freely provided by them to other potential customers.

At OneTree Content, our version of ROI is this: Return On Imagination.

Talk with us. You’ll enjoy the conversation! That’s why we created the company!

– Praveer Shukla, Co-founder, One Tree Content

Miracles and Wisdom from TEDxPilani

TEDxPilani Speakers
TEDxPilani Speakers

Rahul Anand visited TEDxPilani on March 13, 2010 and got a first-hand taste of an electrifying TEDx event. He shares his experiences:

TedXPilani was the first time I visited a TED event and it was truly a phenomenal experience.

First up was Dr. K.N.Ganeshaiah who demonstrated the relation between mythology and science and how mythology is helping in some spheres to understand the science behind it. He cited the case of ‘Sanjeevani’ herb, which is described in Ramayana as a miracle drug and scientists have now found a similar drug that could possibly have some characteristics of it .

Harish Sivaramakrishnan gave a fresh perspective on the user interface, and how it is an important and integral part of the entire user experience. He had some really innovative examples for it; user interface is actually the most overlooked part in application development. Humanize, Beautify, Personalize, Co-Create, Simplify were the central points of his presentation.

Kartick Satyanarayan gave an account of the situation of bears in our country and how Wildlife SOS freed them from the clutches of the kalandar community and also gave the people a new lease of livelihood, and utilized their love for the animals and natural hunting skills for a good cause. Wildlife SOS also sends 600 children of the community to schools giving the biggest gift that one possible can – education.

Vishal Talreja, co- founder of Dream-a-Dream, gave a fantastic speech on life, connecting the dots and about the great work Dream-a-Dream is doing in transformation the lives of young kids, who are alienated by our society. He laid emphasis on being sensitive to our surroundings: if you see a hungry child near your home or office, feed him, do your bit. If everyone does his/her bit, then this world would be a better place to live. Otherwise, all the talk about development does not really hold ground.

Cleo Paskal talked about the grave environment dangers we are facing – issues like whole islands getting submerged in sea, which we might face in the near future.

Nitin Gokhale oulined the possible dangers the country is facing from Naxalism to Economic Disparity.

Rahul Roushan, in his hilarious manner, outlined the difference between Breaking News and Faking news and how some channels are competing with News Channels when all they show is nothing more than Tabloid Journalism.

And at the end, Nakul Shenoy did his mind reading act which was quite fascinating.

Rahul Anand

Rahul Anand is a writer and entrepreneur, always looking for new challenges. He co-founded  simplypoet.com – world’s first multi lingual poetry portal. Currently, he is an Innovation Associate with Source For Change, a rural BPO in Rajasthan. Also, he is part of  TheBetterIndia. com.

Intellectual Property and its relevance to SMEs

Dr. Ashok M. Adur's Intellectual Property Illustration
Dr. Ashok M. Adur's Intellectual Property Illustration

Most medium and small scale companies in India do not leverage intellectual property as a strategic tool to accelerate their commercial success. For example, when you have an idea for a business that is unique, that has a value proposition, you have some intellectual capital. How do you derive value from it?

Intellectual capital is not just about filing patents. It is the aggregate intellectual material knowledge, information, intellectual property, experience that can be put to use strategically to create wealth in a company.

However, it is rare that an SME owner would have access to in-house IP expertise. One way out is to hire right consultants. This could be critical for your business if you wish to grow over a longer time horizon with a sustained competitive advantage.

What could be the benefits of hiring the right consultant to guide your growth and maximize the value of your intellectual property? We list a few benefits here:

  • Dramatically Enhance Value, Competitiveness and Market Share
  • Assessment and Transfer of  Technology
  • Product Development for Various Specialized Applications in Many Diverse Industries
  • Market Research, Competitive Analysis, Business Development and Worldwide Marketing
  • Material Selection, Formulations and Product Development for Optimization of Performance, Cost and Processibility
  • Accelerating Projects from Conception to Innovation to Patenting to Commercialization and Product Introduction
  • Productivity Improvement, Scale-up, Cost Reduction, Quality Improvement, Quality Control and Quality Assurance
  • Strategic Direction and Planning and P/L Turnaround
  • Patents and Licensing – Legally Getting Around Existing Patents
  • Trouble-Shooting and Technical Service
  • Helping You to “Go Green” by Utilizing Recycled and Bio-derived Materials and Using Recycle Materials for Value-Added Applications
  • Other Business and  Technical Areas in Plastics, Polymers, Composites and Packaging

 In subsequent posts I shall provide more insights on how to do so.

Author: Ashok M. Adur, Ph.D. in Polymer Science & Engineering

  • Innovations Consultant; Product, Business & Strategy Development; Optimization of IP, Cost & Resources.
  • Consulting Experience since 1992.
  • Published 13 papers in professional journals and presented over 45 papers at regional, national and international professional conferences. Also moderated and organized some conferences.
  • Listed in “Who’s Who in Plastics” and “International Who’s Who of Entrepreneurs”.
  • Developed several new proprietary inventions, over 66 patents applied, 26 granted so far, resulting in commercializing numerous value-added products to meet specific customer needs and in new annual business of over $1 billion.

Franchise India– Entrepreneurship Summit 2009– F & B

Franchise 2009 Food, Beverage and Hospitality
Franchise 2009 Food, Beverage and Hospitality

Thursday, November 26, 2009. Ashoka Hotel, New Delhi. Day 1 of Franchise India 2009. Continued from Franchise India – Entrepreneurship Summit 2009 – Specialty Retail.

Another interesting session was “Business Opportunities in Food & Beverage Sector”. The speakers were:

  • Mahmood Khan, Hospitality Expert Virginia Tech, USA
  • Pavan Gandhok, CEO, Litebite Foods
  • Gary Moore, MD,The Pizza Co., Thailand
  • Rakhee Nagpal, MD & Chairperson of DVS (Moderator)
  • Luis Daniel, General Manager, KRR International
  • Ankur Sharma, General Manager Business Development , Yo China

Mahmood Khan shared how more than 200 fast food franchise brands have been in developed in USA – a critical factor being ubiquitous Highways (necessitating “quick bites”). He claimed that F&B is a recession-proof business because people will NOT stop eating. His another observation was that today’s customer does not have patience. Technology plays a big role in dealing with customer’s “instant needs”. So, you need to know “real needs of the customer” and continually watch “where the technology is going”.

Pavan Gandhok, CEO, Litebite Foods, opined that the challenge is to present local cuisines in an interesting manner – these items (like vada paav, paav bhaaji, samosa) account for 70-80% of the market and whosoever cracks this code is likely to make lot of money.

Gary Moore, MD, The Pizza Co., was excited about India and said that India is the biggest potential market we have seen in a long time. He emphasized on having “systems in place”. He said, “Brand is a promise of consistency” and successful entrepreneurs achieve that by engineering opportunities for the long-term. Apart from adequate capital, an entrepreneur needs to ask him/herself:

  • What have I developed?
  • What have I grown?
  • What is my passion?

Luis Daniel, General Manager, KRR International, (who started his career as a McDonald crew 25 years ago) shared that after about 3-5 years when operational systems of a business have been set (facilitating smooth expansion), an entrepreneur can “work less and make more”.

Ankur Sharma, General Manager Business Development , Yo China shared that capital needs of a franchise business range from Rs. 3 lakhs to Rs. 1.5 crores. At the smallest level, Kiosk models can yield 100% ROI in one year. A full-fledged restaurant model  can yield 30-35% ROI in one year.

franchise restaurant services market size
franchise restaurant services market size

Franchise India – Entrepreneurship Summit 2009 – Specialty Retail

Franchise India 2009
Franchise India 2009

Thursday, November 26, 2009. Ashoka Hotel, New Delhi. Day 1 of Franchise India 2009 saw scores of enthusiastic entrepreneurs eagerly evaluating various franchise opportunities (300 brands) in India.

Billed as “Asia’s Biggest Franchise Show”, the event came alive in various sections – Brand License 2009, Entrepreneurship Summit ’09, Food & Beverage, Fashion franchising, Knowledge Series, Licensing and Retail.

What aroused our curiosity was the “Entrepreneurship Summit 2009” conference series. Some of the speakers at “Business Opportunities : Specialty Retail” session were:

  • Aloke Banerjee, CEO, Rosebys
  • Vivek Bali, Group President, Spice Hotspot
  • S.Ravikant, COO, Titan Eyewear
  • N.P. Singh, Director, Samsonite
  • Rajiv Agarwal, The Mobile Store
  • Naveen Rakhecha, CEO, Cartridge World

S. Ravikant, COO, Titan Eyewear  was representing Titan, India’s “Largest Specialty Retailer” with turnover of Rs. 3000 Crores. He talked about his franchise offer, “Multi-Brand” Eye+ Retail Stores, as “World Class Optical Stores”. What makes this an attractive opportunity is the fact that most consumers in this space are clueless about quality parameters, concerned about accuracy of lenses and confused about lack of transparency in pricing.

N.P. Singh, shared how Samsonite’s innovations (from 1910) have made it a global leader with 34% of global luggage market share. He presented his Rs. 25+ lakhs franchise opportunity (3 year payback) with a unique offering – “obsolescence replacement”.

A recurring theme was “World Class” – world class products, world class operations, world class systems, world class training, world class technology and so on.

Rajiv Agarwal showcased “The Mobile Store” as a world class shopping experience for the existing fragmented mobile market with a chaotic shopping experience.

Naveen Rakhecha, CEO, Cartridge World shared his gyan, “Look beyond traditional franchise opportunities (Education, F&B, etc). Go for distinguished offering. Unique ideas are likely to give better returns”.

NEXT BUSINESS CAPSULE: Opportunities in Food & Beverage segment.

India Global Summit on MSMEs

Shri. Dinsha J. Patel, Hon’ble Minister of MSMSE at www.nsicindia.com launch
Shri. Dinsha J. Patel, Hon’ble Minister of MSMSE at http://www.nsicindia.com launch

The India Global Summit on MSMEs gets underway on Friday, November 20, 2009 at Hotel The Lalit, Barakhamba Road, New Delhi.

Expect the discussions to revolve around “Building the next generation of MSMEs”, the theme for the summit.

Shri Dinesh Rai, Secretary, Ministry of MSME, is one of the speakers (he was present at the launch of B2B web portal http://www.nsicindia.com for MSME’s as shown in picture). Other speakers include:

  • Arun Maira: Member, Planning Commission
  • Pravir Kumar: Joint Secretary, Ministry of MSME
  • H P kumar: Chairman & MD, NSIC
  • Rakesh Rewari: Deputy MD,  SIDBI
  • Rana Hasan: Principal Economist, ADB
  • Rakesh Singh:  Head SMEs, Standard Chartered Bank

One of  goals of the summit is to explore & deliberate on opportunities for integration of MSMEs in the value chain. Sub-themes include:

  • Investing with Technology upgradation ICT adoption and R&D
  • Dealing with Economic Cycles:  How to adapt the changed economic cycles ?
  • Capital Requirement: What is the right mix of credit and risk capital?
  • Developing people power: Challenges and solutions

On,  Saturday, November 20, 2009, a Buyer Seller Meet has been scheduled between OEMs/ Large Corporations / PSUs and the Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises on one to one basis. Participating companies include:

  • Bechtel India
  • BHEL
  • IDBI Bank
  • International Tractor
  • Maruti Suzuki
  • New Holland Fiat (India)
  • Philips
  • Proctor & Gamble Innovation Centre
  • Standard Chartered

For Registration, Speaking & Sponsorship Opportunities, contact:

Pooja Jha
Direct Tel : +91-11-24653006
Tel: +91-11 – 24629994 –7 Ext 407
Fax : +91-11 – 24615693
Email: pooja.jha@cii.in

For Buyer –Seller Meet & MSME Mart, contact:

Suvendu Mahapatra
Direct Tel : +91-11-24653006
Tel: +91-11 – 24629994 –7 Extn : 409
Fax : +91-11 – 24615693
Email: suvendu.mahapatra@cii.in

If you happen to visit the summit, we would be glad to hear about your experience. Do Write in!