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Invitation to PEERSTRAT at High Tea on Saturday May 17, 2014, New Delhi

Business Strategy: Peer-Review workout session for entrepreneurs and business professionals

Click here to book your seat at Meraevents

Invitation to PEERSTRAT: Peer Strategy Review workout at High Tea on Saturday May 17, 2014, New Delhi
Invitation to PEERSTRAT

Dear Business Folks,

We are delighted to extend an invitation to you for a Peer Strategy Review workout (PEERSTRAT) session conducted by Omnizient Labs:

Date: Saturday, 17th May, 2014
Timings: 3:30 to 6:30
Location: Samavar, B-36A, Pamposh Enclave, GK-1, New Delhi – 110048

The PEERSTRAT sessions enable you explore ways to make your business get bigger, grow faster and be the very best in your industry.

All participants are invited to share the challenges and opportunities they are facing in their business as per following Five Step PEERSTRAT Agenda:

#1 Build Unique Business – Eliminate Competition!
#2 Recreate Brand – Tell a Compelling Story!
#3 Maximize Revenues – Penetrate Newer Markets!
#4 Maximize Profits – Transform Business Processes with Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs)!
#5 Track Success – Identify Critical Success Measures – What Gets Measured Gets Done!

Who will benefit from this event

Independent Professionals, Entrepreneurs, Senior Business Managers, Business Heads, CXOs, Directors @ Companies, Partners of family owned business, Proprietors, Middle Management

Participation

Participation fees are nominal INR 1000 to cover basic cost of the event. Tea and Snacks would be served during the session. Please confirm your participation by marking an email to raj @ bizvidya.com.

Click here to book your seat at Meraevents

Contact Details:
Raju Moza: raj @ Bizvidya.com,  +91-9818-662-001

Where India Went Wrong?

Where India Went Wrong
Where India Went Wrong

Few days ago I woke up to the last quarter growth figures, which have plummeted to unexpected 4.7 % in last quarter ending December 2013. As I write, latest news alerts say India’s exports fall by 3.67% in February 2014.

I got a feeling that this was coming and perhaps it will be difficult for India to come back to the growth trajectory it witnessed in last two decades. Market analysts are busy attributing this down fall to fiscal Deficit, high inflation, policy paralysis, bank rate and myriad of other reasons.

However, my humble submission is that India never looked at its growth impediments holistically. India’s Honourable finance minister is of the view that factors which have contributed to slow down have bottomed out, I beg to differ with him. I am of the view that “Era of high growth” for India is over, only a monumental repair work can bring back it to high growth trajectory, which it witnessed in last two decades.

There are numerous reasons, why this has happened and all of them are plausible but I don’t blame this to pure economics or structural problem, albeit root cause of the problem is somewhere else. I have tried to narrow down it to following three reasons why India have missed a great opportunity:

  1. Growth taken for granted: The perception amongst the policy makers, business people as well state apparatus was that of confidence or even over-confidence, it depicted a sense where all was hunky-dory and that the momentum of growth will remain unabated. Perhaps the basis of this confidence stemmed the way India remain insulated, when 2008 sub-prime crisis hit the world. Another aspect is the way India story was constructed, basis some reports, it gave a false belief in India that high growth is fait accompli. In the bargain, it overlooked the inherent problems in infrastructure, bureaucracy and polity.

  1. Lack of commensurate reforms: Reform was a new word in our lexicon, but the commensurate reforms I am talking about is not typical what we hear like Insurance sector, aviation or retail policy reforms. The two sets of reform which were not commensurate to India’s growth aspirations were Administrative and Political reforms. The way India was administered three decades back, same set of procedures are in vogue. With such an archaic administrative blanket, still one had ambition to become super power defeats logic. As far as the political reforms is concerned,barring some reforms in Election process, overall India polity has worsened.

  1. Over Reliance of Great Indian ‘Jugaad’: Shortcuts, manipulations and a short term view was still the way of life in India. It did some global acquisition, some of its corporations are in fortune 500 list but that ambition of setting up a global empire was conspicuous by its absence. The overall enabling atmosphere encouraged holding a short term view then a long term Nation building Vision.

The history of this world has missed a great opportunity when several million people could have been extracted from poverty. India, as a global power, given its history as nation state, would have been a great balancing power. Its not the misfortune of India, that it missed an opportunity but of world, as it could have been a great contributor to the world progress, if India would have leveraged this opportunity.

Author: Raju Moza has 14+ years of experience across various industries and domains like Telecom, Retail, Education, Electronic & Mobile Services, Travel & Hospitality and Manufacturing. He has been a turnaround leader with deep insights in understanding of diverse markets. He is regularly invited to speak at seminars and conferences. Besides the strong business pedigree, he is an ‘active writer’, has written some of the critically acclaimed pieces on diverse subjects namely Kashmir, Afghanistan, Political Islam, International Affairs, Political Economy and Short Stories. He recently shot a documentary as well.  He is an MBA in finance and has recently done a Venture Capital development program from ISB, Hyderabad, India.

WriteEasy: Anatomy Of Good Written English

In our society, the study of language is the domain of poets, novelists, and literary critics. Just look at the value of a college degree in English versus one in computer science or accounting. But is this an accurate assessment of value?

Language is the primary conductor between you and your audience. Ineffective language weakens and distorts ideas. If you want to be understood and your ideas to spread, you must learn to write good English.
But, what is ‘Good English’? Good English is that which is readable by most people. It has several nuances – let us discuss a few!

Brevity

  • ‘We have no information at this time, but we’ll make a formal announcement the moment we do’ can be briefly expressed as ‘ We don’t know yet, but will tell you when we do’.
  • A ‘manually operated, personalised, recreational, eco-tool’ can also be called a ‘spade’.

But unfortunately verbosity is usually equated with command over the language. The airline pilot who announces that he is presently anticipating or experiencing considerable precipitation wouldn’t think of saying it may rain. That sentence is too simple–there must be something wrong with it!

To improve brevity, simply use George Orwell’s advice

Never use a metaphor, simile, or other figure of speech which you are used to seeing in print.
Never use a long word where a short one will do.
If it is possible to cut a word out, always cut it out.
Never use the passive where you can use the active.
Never use a foreign phrase, a scientific word, or a jargon word if you can think of an everyday English equivalent.

If you get criticized for limited word choice, rejoice for being in good company. When Hemingway was criticized by Faulkner, he had replied:

‘Poor Faulkner. Does he really think big emotions come from big words? He thinks I don’t know the ten-dollar words. I know them all right. But there are older and simpler and better words, and those are the ones I use’.

Clarity

Clarity has two angles –

Frequently confused words:

Some words are frequently confused due to similarity in spelling, rhyme or closeness in meaning. ‘Complementary’ gets written as ‘complimentary’. ‘Liable’ gets used where ‘likely’ would fit better. ‘Anxious’ is used where ‘Eager’ is desirable. More here.

Burden on those with lower standards:

Most writers assume that the reader would share their own standards of English and know the context in which they are writing. This may not always be true. The executive or shop floor person within your own organization may have a much lower standard than your own. And think about the problems of writing in today’s globalized environment.

Compare the following sentences –
1. Reading is hard; writing is harder.
2.  Reading is difficult; writing is more difficult than reading.

On first look, the first version appears better written than the second. It not only contains fewer words but fewer words with more than one syllable. Version 1 is brief, plain, direct, even slightly poetic. In contrast, the second is slow, pedestrian, and prosaic. Yet, people who read English as their second language would probably have more trouble with the first than the second. Why?

In the first, better-written version, the key word is hard, a word with several meanings. Here the writer has used it in the sense of ‘difficult’ in a metaphorical way. However, a person learning English is unlikely to know the metaphorical sense of hard as difficult. Nor would the bilingual dictionary such a person consults, list the “difficult” equivalent as the first meaning.

English is the first language of about 400 million people, but there are more than another billion people who speak it as a second language. This makes it necessary for global writers to use a style that reduces the burden of understanding on others.

Grammar

Errors of grammar increase the likelihood of confusion and also make the writer look uneducated to others. They also suggest that the person in not detail oriented. CEO of a CEO of iFixit, the largest online repair community, has gone so far as to say that he won’t hire anyone with poor grammar. He says, ‘Grammar is my litmus test. All applicants say they’re detail-oriented; I just make my employees prove it’.

Form & Usage

Along with grammar, bad form and usage also make a writer appear uneducated to others. Writing ‘I find it easy to pull up with you’ instead of ‘I find it easy to pull along with you’ will not endear you to your superiors.

Flexibility through variety

Brief, clear, correct and good form & usage is a winning combination, but even this is not the final or only criterion. Audience analysis has long been a basic principle of effective communication. You would adopt a completely different style of writing altogether when preparing research papers for the scientific or medical community than you would if you were writing the horse racing form guide. Matching writing style to audience is imperative.

So, what can we do about these aspects? I am delighted to present WriteEasy courses from Soluto Learning.

WriteEasy courses provide specific help in respect of all above elements of good English. The courses are completely web-enabled, highly interactive and focused for the needs of their respective segments.

WriteEasy Advanced helps reduce verbosity and improve clarity & flow whereas WriteEasy Essentials helps in correcting grammar and usage. Differences between various courses are here.

Other details, including a free Intro course, are at www.solutolearning.com.

Will Car Sharing Work In India?

Greg Moran and David aim to introduce “Zoom Car India”, a Car Sharing service in India, beginning with Bangalore. While we do have initiatives like www.poolmycar.in in India, “Car Sharing” aims to be different than “Car Pooling” or “Ride Sharing”.  They are using indiegogo.com to raise $ 15,000 out of the $ 500,000 investment they intend to raise after the Proof of Concept (POC) is established.

Zoom Car India
Zoom Car India

Their pitch here states:

If you live in Bangalore, you should donate so that we can bring this service to you as soon as possible! We also have some great incentives to get you behind the wheel of a Zoom vehicle.

If you don’t live in India, you should consider donating because of the enormous social and environmental benefits that car-sharing provides.  By leveraging investment capital and re-investing revenues from members, we will give your donation’s ultimate impact a huge multiplier effect!

More updates on this venture can be seen here.

 

CARMa – Creating Access to Resources and Markets

Professor Nandini Vaidyanathan is a traveling teacher who teaches entrepreneurship in several ivy -league business schools around the world including Princeton, London School of Economics and National University of Singapore, overseas and in India in IIMA, IIMB, IIML and ISB. A year ago, she founded CARMa (Creating Access to Resources & Markets), (www.carmaconnect.in) with a lofty ambition: to change the karma of entrepreneurs in India. She writes a regular monthly column for the magazine, Entrepreneur. She is a TED speaker. She has just published her book Entrepedia, a step by step guide to becoming an entrepreneur in India. The book has a prelaunch sale of 50,000 copies and is on its way to becoming a best seller.

Here, she is sharing about CARMa offerings.

Our whole life revolves around entrepreneurs. We are passionate believers that India should be a country of a billion entrepreneurs – either you have your own enterprise or you think and feel so entrepreneurially that you feel like an entrepreneur even if you don’t own the enterprise.

We believe that the biggest pain point for all entrepreneurs, irrespective of what stage they are in, is access to resources and markets. And that’s where CARMa (Creating Access to Resources and Markets) comes in. CARMa addresses this pain point by:

  • CARMa Sutra: Mentoring entrepreneurs (start-ups, mature enterprises and family businesses)
  • CARMa Shala: An online 20-hour certificate course in Entrepreneurship for aspiring entrepreneurs, start-up entrepreneurs as well as employees who have P&L responsibility and are expected to think and behave like entrepreneurs
  • AskYourMentor: Unique real-time ‘need-based’ mentoring when you require it.

CARMa Sutra
Entrepreneurs usually come to us and ask us two things: Will you validate my idea and on what basis do you pick your mentees.

Our answer is standard. No, we will not validate your idea because we have no authority (and we have no certain way of telling you) what will work or which idea might fail. All we will help you do is build a robust business model and such a strong value differentiator that even if the market gets flooded by competitors tomorrow, your customers will still swear by you.

And two, we don’t pick and choose our mentees. We look for just a few things – is the entrepreneur’s heart in the right place and does he have what it takes to last the entrepreneurial journey – the highs and the lows, the good and the bad. Once these two questions are out of the way, CARMa Sutra begins.

CARMa Sutra is our sustained 6-month mentorship program, which is a completely mentee-driven engagement:

  • We mentor entrepreneurs in the startup phase, growth enterprises as well as family businesses.
  • As an entrepreneur, you come to us and identify three areas of mentoring. These could be your vulnerable areas or so critical to building your business that not having a mentor is not an option.
  • Once these are outlined, they are broken into milestones to ensure that you, the mentee, and your lead mentor (Sutradhar) are on the same page.
  • Over the course of the six months, the lead mentor may bring in other mentors, who are domain experts, to mentor you.
  • Write to carmasutra@carmaconnect.in for more or click here for more information: http://carmaconnect.in/carmasutra.php

CARMa Shala
Most people don’t become entrepreneurs in India, simply because they don’t know how. There is no course that tells you in simple and easy steps the things you need to get the idea off the drawing board into the market place.

There is no course in India which is India-centric, real-time and fitted within in the Indian framework. So what’s the point in knowing how to incorporate a company in America, when you want to set up shop in India?

And that’s where CARMa Shala comes into the picture:

  • CARMa Shala is a 20-hour, 20-module online certificate course in Entrepreneurship.
  • It is a go-to course, like a dictionary.
  • If you want to become an entrepreneur, or, if you are in the start-up phase, CARMa Shala tells you in easy, simple, 20 steps, what are the things you need to do from the time you decide to become an entrepreneur to becoming market-ready.

For an individual registration, CARMa Shala costs just Rs. 2,650 (which includes a copy of the best-selling book Entrepedia). You get CARMa Shala through your college to get the benefit of bulk registrations. Click here for more: http://carmaconnect.in/carmashala_more.php

AskYourMentor:
If you’re an entrepreneur on the brink of a crisis or in the thick of it, wouldn’t it be nice if you could have access to a mentor right then and there? A mentor who is a subject-expert; a mentor who has the wisdom gained from experience to give you clarity and direction; and a mentor with whom you can have a trouble-shooting conversation when you need it, as you need it.

All this without paying an arm and a leg, which is what you would if you brought on board a consultant. Get on to www.carmaconnect.in, choose your mentor, buy his time in units of 30 minutes and get mentored instantly! Click here for more information/or to register now: http://carmaconnect.in/askyourmentor.php

Franchise India– Entrepreneurship Summit 2009– F & B

Franchise 2009 Food, Beverage and Hospitality
Franchise 2009 Food, Beverage and Hospitality

Thursday, November 26, 2009. Ashoka Hotel, New Delhi. Day 1 of Franchise India 2009. Continued from Franchise India – Entrepreneurship Summit 2009 – Specialty Retail.

Another interesting session was “Business Opportunities in Food & Beverage Sector”. The speakers were:

  • Mahmood Khan, Hospitality Expert Virginia Tech, USA
  • Pavan Gandhok, CEO, Litebite Foods
  • Gary Moore, MD,The Pizza Co., Thailand
  • Rakhee Nagpal, MD & Chairperson of DVS (Moderator)
  • Luis Daniel, General Manager, KRR International
  • Ankur Sharma, General Manager Business Development , Yo China

Mahmood Khan shared how more than 200 fast food franchise brands have been in developed in USA – a critical factor being ubiquitous Highways (necessitating “quick bites”). He claimed that F&B is a recession-proof business because people will NOT stop eating. His another observation was that today’s customer does not have patience. Technology plays a big role in dealing with customer’s “instant needs”. So, you need to know “real needs of the customer” and continually watch “where the technology is going”.

Pavan Gandhok, CEO, Litebite Foods, opined that the challenge is to present local cuisines in an interesting manner – these items (like vada paav, paav bhaaji, samosa) account for 70-80% of the market and whosoever cracks this code is likely to make lot of money.

Gary Moore, MD, The Pizza Co., was excited about India and said that India is the biggest potential market we have seen in a long time. He emphasized on having “systems in place”. He said, “Brand is a promise of consistency” and successful entrepreneurs achieve that by engineering opportunities for the long-term. Apart from adequate capital, an entrepreneur needs to ask him/herself:

  • What have I developed?
  • What have I grown?
  • What is my passion?

Luis Daniel, General Manager, KRR International, (who started his career as a McDonald crew 25 years ago) shared that after about 3-5 years when operational systems of a business have been set (facilitating smooth expansion), an entrepreneur can “work less and make more”.

Ankur Sharma, General Manager Business Development , Yo China shared that capital needs of a franchise business range from Rs. 3 lakhs to Rs. 1.5 crores. At the smallest level, Kiosk models can yield 100% ROI in one year. A full-fledged restaurant model  can yield 30-35% ROI in one year.

franchise restaurant services market size
franchise restaurant services market size

Franchise India – Entrepreneurship Summit 2009 – Specialty Retail

Franchise India 2009
Franchise India 2009

Thursday, November 26, 2009. Ashoka Hotel, New Delhi. Day 1 of Franchise India 2009 saw scores of enthusiastic entrepreneurs eagerly evaluating various franchise opportunities (300 brands) in India.

Billed as “Asia’s Biggest Franchise Show”, the event came alive in various sections – Brand License 2009, Entrepreneurship Summit ’09, Food & Beverage, Fashion franchising, Knowledge Series, Licensing and Retail.

What aroused our curiosity was the “Entrepreneurship Summit 2009” conference series. Some of the speakers at “Business Opportunities : Specialty Retail” session were:

  • Aloke Banerjee, CEO, Rosebys
  • Vivek Bali, Group President, Spice Hotspot
  • S.Ravikant, COO, Titan Eyewear
  • N.P. Singh, Director, Samsonite
  • Rajiv Agarwal, The Mobile Store
  • Naveen Rakhecha, CEO, Cartridge World

S. Ravikant, COO, Titan Eyewear  was representing Titan, India’s “Largest Specialty Retailer” with turnover of Rs. 3000 Crores. He talked about his franchise offer, “Multi-Brand” Eye+ Retail Stores, as “World Class Optical Stores”. What makes this an attractive opportunity is the fact that most consumers in this space are clueless about quality parameters, concerned about accuracy of lenses and confused about lack of transparency in pricing.

N.P. Singh, shared how Samsonite’s innovations (from 1910) have made it a global leader with 34% of global luggage market share. He presented his Rs. 25+ lakhs franchise opportunity (3 year payback) with a unique offering – “obsolescence replacement”.

A recurring theme was “World Class” – world class products, world class operations, world class systems, world class training, world class technology and so on.

Rajiv Agarwal showcased “The Mobile Store” as a world class shopping experience for the existing fragmented mobile market with a chaotic shopping experience.

Naveen Rakhecha, CEO, Cartridge World shared his gyan, “Look beyond traditional franchise opportunities (Education, F&B, etc). Go for distinguished offering. Unique ideas are likely to give better returns”.

NEXT BUSINESS CAPSULE: Opportunities in Food & Beverage segment.

India Global Summit on MSMEs

Shri. Dinsha J. Patel, Hon’ble Minister of MSMSE at www.nsicindia.com launch
Shri. Dinsha J. Patel, Hon’ble Minister of MSMSE at http://www.nsicindia.com launch

The India Global Summit on MSMEs gets underway on Friday, November 20, 2009 at Hotel The Lalit, Barakhamba Road, New Delhi.

Expect the discussions to revolve around “Building the next generation of MSMEs”, the theme for the summit.

Shri Dinesh Rai, Secretary, Ministry of MSME, is one of the speakers (he was present at the launch of B2B web portal http://www.nsicindia.com for MSME’s as shown in picture). Other speakers include:

  • Arun Maira: Member, Planning Commission
  • Pravir Kumar: Joint Secretary, Ministry of MSME
  • H P kumar: Chairman & MD, NSIC
  • Rakesh Rewari: Deputy MD,  SIDBI
  • Rana Hasan: Principal Economist, ADB
  • Rakesh Singh:  Head SMEs, Standard Chartered Bank

One of  goals of the summit is to explore & deliberate on opportunities for integration of MSMEs in the value chain. Sub-themes include:

  • Investing with Technology upgradation ICT adoption and R&D
  • Dealing with Economic Cycles:  How to adapt the changed economic cycles ?
  • Capital Requirement: What is the right mix of credit and risk capital?
  • Developing people power: Challenges and solutions

On,  Saturday, November 20, 2009, a Buyer Seller Meet has been scheduled between OEMs/ Large Corporations / PSUs and the Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises on one to one basis. Participating companies include:

  • Bechtel India
  • BHEL
  • IDBI Bank
  • International Tractor
  • Maruti Suzuki
  • New Holland Fiat (India)
  • Philips
  • Proctor & Gamble Innovation Centre
  • Standard Chartered

For Registration, Speaking & Sponsorship Opportunities, contact:

Pooja Jha
Direct Tel : +91-11-24653006
Tel: +91-11 – 24629994 –7 Ext 407
Fax : +91-11 – 24615693
Email: pooja.jha@cii.in

For Buyer –Seller Meet & MSME Mart, contact:

Suvendu Mahapatra
Direct Tel : +91-11-24653006
Tel: +91-11 – 24629994 –7 Extn : 409
Fax : +91-11 – 24615693
Email: suvendu.mahapatra@cii.in

If you happen to visit the summit, we would be glad to hear about your experience. Do Write in!

Oakley: Appetite for luxury products is huge in India

Bindu D. Menon (Businessline, The Hindu) reports that Versace, Oakley and Nike Golf are increasing area and product assortments to draw consumer interest in what they consider one of the biggest markets in Asia.

Quotable Quotes:

Mr Scott Bowers, Senior Vice-President (Global Marketing and Brand Development), Oakley Inc:

“India is one of the strongest markets in Asia and this is where we are looking to establish our product line.

Until now, we were cautious with expansion but now we will be making a lot of noise.

The appetite for luxury products is huge. We are exploring means to entrench ourselves here.

Mr Marc Duhm, Wholesale Director, Versace:

“The purchasing power in India is a major factor while considering expansion. We will keep looking at opportunities in markets where we feel they are growing.

The slowdown in our business is a temporary one and we will keep looking at opportunities to grow our business.”

Mr Abhay Gupta, Executive Director, The Blue Clothing Company:

Consumers are seeking high-end brands and purchasing power is back with a bang. We have had a good response to Versace.

Our next venture will be to launch high-end jewellery brands in India. However, easing of FDI norms will help the industry grow.

Premium brands enable value addition by helping to improve retailing experience and manpower training.”

Read the full article here.

ET: SMEs drive India’s growth to prosperity

Now that SMEs can raise funds through NSE/BSE, what more can be done to empower SMEs to drive India’s growth to prosperity?

According to ET Bureau, SEBI’s latest move “can be but one step
towards removing the panoply of constraints that they face on a daily basis.”

Some suggestions by ET Bureau:

  • Remove routine informational rigidities between SMEs and lenders and potential investors.
  • A more responsive policy mechanism to finance SMEs: what is necessary is an array of advisory and business development services focused on SMEs: the idea is to improve credit and business-performance information.
  • Innovative financial products to reduce credit risks for SMEs and boost investor comfort.
  • Address the problem of delayed payments and rationalise the tax regime for SMEs.

Finally we  enthusiastically agree with the assertion:

We need a thriving SME sector to boost entrepreneurship and risk-taking pan-India, and spur innovation and growth.

Read the full article here.